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Securing Arizona's Water Future

Environmental Conditions of the Southeastern Arizona Planning Area - Arizona Water Protection Fund and Instream Flow Claims

Environmental conditions reflect the impacts of geography, climate and cultural activities and may be a critical consideration in water resource management and supply development.  The sky island ecosystems of the planning area are relatively isolated from each other, and as a result there are a large number of endemic species in the planning area mountain ranges.  These ecosystems are of major interest to resource managers due to their biological diversity and distinct biogeography. (Warshall, 2006)  Discussed in this section is vegetation, riparian protection through the Arizona Water Protection Fund Program, instream flow claims, threatened and endangered species, protected public lands and unique waters.

Arizona Water Protection Fund

Forty-five riparian restoration projects in the Southeastern Arizona Planning Area have been funded by the Arizona Water Protection Fund Program (AWPF) through FY 2008. The objective of the AWPF program is to provide funds for protection and restoration of Arizona’s rivers and streams and associated riparian habitats.  There are funded projects in ten of the fourteen planning area basins.  Most projects have been funded in the Safford, Upper San Pedro, Cienega Creek and Lower San Pedro basins. Many of these projects were for the purpose of fencing, often in conjunction with water development, and for research.  A list of projects and types of projects funded in the Southeastern Arizona Planning Area through FY 2008 is found in Appendix A of this volume.  For a description of the program, a complete listing of all projects funded, and a reference map click here or visit the Arizona Water Protection Fund website.

Instream Flow Claims

An instream flow right is a non-diversionary appropriation of surface water for recreation and wildlife use.  Thirty-four applications for instream flow claims have been filed in the Southeastern Arizona Planning Area as of August 2008.  They are listed in Table 3.0-1 and shown on Figure 3.0-11. Claims have been filed in nine of the fourteen planning area basins.  Certificates have been issued for claims on Aravaipa Creek in the Aravaipa Canyon and Lower San Pedro basins; Bass Canyon in the Lower and Upper San Pedro basins; Hot Springs Canyon and Wildcat Canyon in the Lower San Pedro Basin; Leslie Creek in the Douglas Basin; Mescal Creek in the Dripping Springs Wash Basin; and O’Donnell Creek, Ramsey Canyon and the San Pedro River in the Upper San Pedro Basin.  Other basins with instream flow applications are Bonita Creek, Duncan Valley, Morenci and Safford.

 

Click to view Figure 3.0-11

 

water drop Click here to continue to the Next Section: 3.0.3 Environmental Conditions - Threatened and Endangered Species, Protected Areas and Unique Waters  

 

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